Farmers’ blockade hits Azadpur Mandi traders, no buyers from Haryana, UP


The blockade of Haryana-Delhi border by the protesting farmers has led to a steep decline in footfall at Asia’s largest fruit and vegetable market — Azadpur Mandi in Delhi.

Traders of Azadpur Mandi in Delhi. Most of the traders claim that apprehension over violence and blockade of roads have been keeping the clients away. (Photo: Abhishek Anand / India Today)

The blockade of Haryana-Delhi border by the protesting farmers has led to a steep decline in footfall at Asia’s largest fruit and vegetable market — Azadpur Mandi in Delhi.

According to traders, the truckers are delivering vegetables and fruits from Punjab, Haryana, Himachal and Rajasthan and are making their way to the mandi through various routes, however, the majority of buyers from neighbouring states of Haryana and Uttar Pradesh have been missing, which is leading to a stockpile of fruits and vegetables.

Pammi Kumar, a fruit dealer at the mandi, says there had been no clients from Haryana since the border was blocked.

“We are dealing with a grave situation. The farmers are sending their produce and the truckers are somehow making it to the mandi through various routes, but there are lesser clients. Being close to Haryana, Azadpur Mandi attracts a number of wholesalers and retailers from Haryana and parts of Uttar Pradesh. But since the key road is blocked, the buyers are not able to come,” said Pammi.

The traders claim that apprehension over violence and road blockade are keeping the clients away.

“We have made calls to our regular wholesale clients to inform them that good quality consignment has arrived, but they have simply expressed inability to reach the mandi. They fear violence and further road blockade by the protesters. Large quantities of vegetables remain unsold,” said Mahavir Chauhan, a trader at Azadpur Mandi who deals in tomatoes.

Truckers who were stuck in traffic jams at GT-Karnal Road in Haryana, amid the farmers’ protest at Singhu border, have made their way to the mandi — taking a detour of 100-200 kilometres. Happy Singh, a trucker from Punjab, who had to deliver kinnow to the mandi, said, “Our trucks were stuck in a traffic jam near Punjab-Haryana border for nearly two days. Then we decided to take a detour of about 150 kilometres to reach the mandi. Now, more trucks are following the same route. It’s time consuming and costly, but at least we have reached the mandi with the produce. Now, I will return with vegetables to Punjab via the same route.”



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *